Windows 10 1703 download iso itasca bankruptcy law

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WebNov 10,  · Win B Pro.x iso: Free Download, Borrow, and Streaming: Internet Archive There Is No Preview Available For This Item This item does not appear . WebOct 31,  · I don’t know the official Microsoft site for downloading Windows 10 version (I guess Microsoft wants us to download the latest version of Windows ) So I . WebOct 19,  · Download Windows 10 ISO directly from Microsoft without Media Creation Tool. You can easily access any version of Windows 10 from this Microsoft download .
 
 

Full text of “Computerworld”

 
When I was five years old my parents moved to Tamworth, New Hampshire. After spending four years amidst the prairies of the West it was indeed a pleasure to look again upon the grand ranges of mountains in this part of New England. Hamlin Morrison County.

 

Key documents | Review of the model WHS laws | Engage SWA – Question Info

 

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Windows 10 1703 download iso itasca bankruptcy law. FIFTY YEARS IN THE NORTHWEST.

 
 

Moose hunting is a healthy though laborious pastime. The hunter must be an expert, and it requires years of practice to become skillful.

He must build his camp in the wilderness, packing thither his food, blankets, camp utensils and gun. With his pack of dogs he starts out in search of a moose yard. This is generally in some well timbered district. The snow in winter is generally from three to six feet deep, but the moose has broken paths through this to facilitate his movements through the forest, and here he roams about in fancied security, browsing on the young shrubs, but the hunter finds his hiding place. In such case he conceals himself in the snow near one of these [Pg xv] paths and waits patiently till the moose passes, when he fires upon him.

If the moose is killed at once the hunter waits patiently in his hiding place till another and another comes up to share a like fate. If the moose is only wounded he starts off as rapidly through the snow as his long legs will carry him, pursued by the hunter and his dogs.

The hunter has all the advantages of the position, being mounted on snowshoes, thus being able to move with comparative swiftness, while the moose plunges heavily through the snow, and at last, weakened by loss of blood, he is overtaken and easily killed.

Mount Bigelow. For years it had been my strong desire to make the ascent, and in May, , the desire was gratified. With six others, I left camp, and by evening reached Green’s hotel, where we obtained lodgings for the evening.

At early dawn, having supplied ourselves with lunch, tin cup and hatchet, we began the ascent on the northeast side. We soon passed the thrifty timber and aided our ascent of the craggy sides of the mountain by clinging to the shrubs that found roothold in the crevices of the rocks.

It may not be amiss to say that we rested, that we rested frequently, for mountain climbing is no light work for those unaccustomed to it. While toiling wearily upward we found ourselves enveloped in mist, or a cloud, from which we soon emerged to find the heavens above us clear and bright, while leaden clouds shut out the landscape below.

At twelve o’clock, noon, we were on the summit. By this time the clouds had been dispersed. The air was clear and cold and beneath us lay, as in a beautiful panorama, the lands and lakes of Maine. There are two peaks, about half a mile apart, between which is a valley and a small lake.

From the highest of these peaks the view was magnificent. In the far north we imagined we saw Canada. The vast, northern expanse was all unoccupied save by a few farms at the foot of the mountain, and by a few camps of lumbermen, hunters and trappers. Looking to the northeast, we saw in the blue distance, glittering with snow drifts, Mount Katahdin. A little north of the divide line to Katahdin lay Moosehead lake, the largest, most beautiful lake in Maine.

At this season of the year the snow had disappeared from the valleys and hills, but the summits of the mountains were still [Pg xvi] white. In all directions the scene was grand and inspiring.

We could trace the Kennebec river in its windings to the sea and fancied we could see in the dim distance the blue Atlantic. To the southwest mountains seemed piled on mountains, while here and there in intermediate vales bright lakes reflected the blue of the upper deep. In this direction there were farms, but they looked like mere dots on the face of the earth. Lake Umbagog lay coiled in the shade of distant mountains in the southwest. We fancied that we could see the ragged crest of the white mountain still further beyond.

The scene had also its historical associations. Along the base of this mountain, on the northwestern side, ere his name had been sullied by the foulest treason in our country’s history, Benedict Arnold bravely led the Colonial troops in the campaign against Canada.

With him, as an aid, was Col. Bigelow, whose name is given to the mountain. The gallant little army halted on the banks of Dead river at the base of the mountain, and made their camp.

While the army was resting at this camp Lieut. Bigelow ascended the mountain and planted his country’s flag upon the highest peak, doubtless the first white man who made the ascent, and the mountain is his monument to-day. Around the site of the camp was planted the colony of Flagstaff. While we were gazing on the magnificent scene, musing upon its varied beauties and recalling its historical associations, the sun set, and reluctantly we set out on our return, a descent the more perilous because it was growing dark.

Extreme caution was necessary; nevertheless we made good headway, as we found ourselves sometimes sliding and even rolling down the path that we had ascended with so much difficulty in the forenoon.

It was long after nightfall that, tired and hungry, we reached Wyman’s hotel on the banks of Dead river. Lumbering in Maine. The first thing was to select a place for operations. This was done in the open season. When the winter had fairly set in the lumberman, with his ox teams, generally six oxen to a sled, the sleds laden with camp plunder, would start for the pineries.

The slow ox teams would consume many days making the journey. The crew of men employed for the winter generally met the teams in camp. The snow would [Pg xvii] be cleared away for the camp, and a fire built. The cook would prepare a supper of fried pork, fritters or pancakes, tea, syrup and New England apple sauce, the crew meanwhile cutting boughs, wood, etc. Supper over, the cattle were tied to trees and fed. Water was secured for evening use only. A glowing fire would be kept up, around which the crew would gather to spend the evening in talking over the adventures of the day, discussing plans for the morrow or singing camp songs.

Thus the evening would pass merrily and swiftly. At the hour for retiring parties of two would spread their blankets on a couch of fir or cedar boughs, and lie down to rest. Next morning the cook would rise at four o’clock to prepare breakfast, which over, as soon as it was light enough the crew would commence the work of the day. Every man goes to his assigned duties, the boss in charge having the general oversight. The life of a lumberman is one of exposure to the elements, yet it is not necessarily unfriendly to the development of character.

With a well ordered camp and gentlemanly crew the winter may pass away pleasantly, and the young man engaged in the comparatively hard toil of the camp, may, with books and papers and cheerful converse with the more thoughtful of his elders, improve the long evenings spent around the camp fire. Many a Maine boy has received here the greater part of his training for the duties of after life. Sunday was usually occupied in reading, singing, and doing some of the lighter work of camp, such as repairing sleds, shoeing oxen and making axe helves or visiting neighboring camps.

It was a day of rest only so far as the heavier work of the camp was suspended. Sanctuary privileges there were none. The work would often close in the sunny days of March. The men would mostly depart for home. A few would remain to drive the logs with the first water from the melting of the snows late in April. Driving logs in the rapid waters of Maine is hazardous work.

Scarcely a day passes without imminent risk to life and limb of the hardy and venturesome men engaged in the work of breaking log landings and jams, and running boats. Men are exposed to wet and cold from dawn till dark. This work requires active and vigorous men, constitutionally fitted and carefully trained [Pg xviii] to the work. They are usually sociable, lively and wide awake, these qualities enabling them to endure, and even to enjoy, the life of hardship which they lead, and to which they become so accustomed that they are unwilling to leave it until worn out by its inevitable hardship.

Folsom Frontispiece James S. Blanding Reuben F. Warner opp Rev. Boutwell Devil’s Chair Frank N. Peterson Rev. Washburn opp John S. Pillsbury opp St. Anthony Falls Birdseye View of St. Paul opp Henry H. Sibley opp Alex. Ramsey opp Henry M. Rice opp Edmund Rice opp Wm. Rainey Marshall opp Wm. Fisher John B. Sanborn opp H. Hall Hon. Le Duc Lucius F. Going West. James Duane Doty 19 James H. Lockwood 20 Indian Troubles 21 John S. Jones 31 S. Anderson 55 Emanuel D. Farmer 56 Col.

John Greely 56 Mrs. Leach 58 Socrates Nelson 58 Mrs. William Holcombe William S. Barron George W. Brownell Col. Robert C. Murphy Edward Worth Mrs. Mary C. Worth Maurice M. Samuels Joseph B. McGlothlin Andrew L. Tuttle John Weymouth B. Reynolds Augustus Gaylord James D. Reymert William J. Stratton Elma M. Blanding Blanding Family Frederick G. Bartlett Michael Field Alden Rev.

Peabody V. Smith Clayton Reuben F. Nason Joel F. Gallespie Luck William H. Carmi P. Garlick John S. Godfrey William A. Talboys Charles H. Staples J. Peake George Wilson Samuel B.

Dresser Frederic A. Dresser Oscar A. Clark Oscar F. Knapp Mrs. Elisabeth B. Hayes Cyrus G. Bradley W. Hale Edgar C. Treadwell St.

Croix Falls St. Samuel Deneen William W. John B. Page Dr. Henning Moses S. Gibson Col. Otis Hoyt S. Fuller Miles H. Van Meter Philip B. Jewell John Tobin Horace A. Moffatt James H. Childs William Dwelley James M.

Fulton Marcus A. Fulton David C. Fulton N. Holden William H. Semmes Sterling Jones D. Bailey Henry C. Baker Mert Herrick D. Baldwin John Comstock Lucius P. Wetherby John C. Spooner Thomas Porter Herman L. Humphrey Theodore Cogswell Frank P. Catlin Charles Y.

Denniston A. Jefferson Samuel C. Symonds John E. Price E. Bundy Towns and Biographies. Bradley William Dailey Robert and Wm.

Johnson Joel Bartlett Francis W. Bartlett George C. Hough Silas Staples Dr. Henry Murdock Steven N. Samuel Harriman St. Vance Allen R. Wilson E. Pierce Hans B.

Taylor John Huitt John M. Thayer A. Andrews Joseph A. Short Prof. Allen H. Weld Allen P. Weld George W. Nichols W. Powell Oliver S. Powell Nils P. Haugen H. Burnett County. Stratton Barron County. Ashland County. Haskell G. Vaughn Dr. Edwin Ellis Martin Beaser Hon. Sam S. Fifield Bayfield County.

Newton Judge Solon H. Clough Vincent Roy D. Frederic Ayer Rev. William T. Boutwell Discovery of Itasca [Pg xxx] Mrs.

Hester C. Grant, Sr. Robinson Hiram Brackett Randall K. Burrows John S. Kanabec County. History, Boundaries, etc. Danforth N. Danforth Alvah J. Cater M. Cater Edwin Allen John H. Allen A. Damon [Pg xxxi] C. Ingalls Mrs. Lavina L. Hallberg Charles A. Anderson Frank N. Pratt Voloro D. Eddy F. Brown Patten W. Davis James F. Harvey Floyd S. Bates Isaac H. Warner Charles F. Lowe Wells Farr John G.

Mold George L. Blood Joel G. Jesse Taylor Joshua L. Taylor Nathan C. Taylor Thomas F. Morton Henry N. Setzer Patrick Fox William F. Newbury Emil Munch A. Wilmarth Lucius K. Stannard James W. Mullen David Caneday George B. Folsom Aaron M. Chase Peter Abear Levi W. Folsom Eddington Knowles Dr. Lucius B. Smith William Comer E. Whiting and Brothers Frederic Tang, Sr. Folsom George W. Seymour James A. Edwards Stephen J. Gray John P. Tombler Dr. Furber Samuel W. Furber Theodore Furber James S.

Dibble George Harris Harley D. Crosby Reuben H. Parker Hiram Berkey George B. Otis William Clark James R.

Meredith [Pg xxxiv] John D. Ward Samuel Judd Frederic W. Lammers James R. Ford Daniel Hopkins, Sr. Lyman Henry A. Jackman Frederic J. City of Stillwater. Isaac Staples Samuel F. Murdock George M. Seymour Frank A. Susannah Tepass William E.

Thorne Edmund J. Butts A. Easton Edwin A. Folsom John B. Castle Abraham L. Gallespie John C. Gardiner V. Seward Ralph Wheeler Edward S. Van Voorhes Andrew J. Van Voorhes Henry C. Van Voorhes C.

Bromley Charles J. Butler Levi E. Thompson George Davis William M. McCluer John N. Ahl Samuel M. Register J. Johnson Gold T. Curtis Harley D.

Curtis Francis R. Delano Henry W. Cannon Dwight M. Stearns County. Organization and History of St. Wilson Charles T. Stearns Henry G. Collins Henry C. Waite Gen. Lowry A. Evans Ambrose Freeman Nathan F. Barnes Nehemiah P. Clark Oscar E. Garrison Charles A. Gilman Other Citizens Anoka County.

Arnold S. Ridge J. Green S. Haskell M. Frost A. Bean A. Fridley William Staples Capt. James Starkey Sherburne County. DeLille Howard M. Atkins B. Cater J. Bean J. Jamieson A. Heath Dr. George Royal George W. Benton County. Benedict J.

Wood William H. Wood Mrs. Wood A. DeLacy Wood P. Wood Rev. Hamlin Morrison County. Churchill John M. Kidder Warren Kobe Ola K.

Black Ira W. Bouch Robert Russell Peter A. Green Rodolphus D. Kinney John D. Logan Crow Wing County. White Allen Morrison Charles F. Aitkin County. Watkins St. Louis County. Stuntz George E. Stone Charles H. Graves Ozro P. Stearns Lake County. Description Two Harbors Cook County.

Anthony Incorporated Annexation to Minneapolis, St. Anthony List of Mayors Water vs. Calvin A. Tuttle Cyrus Aldrich Dr. Alfred E. Ames Dr. Albert A. Ames Jesse Ames Cadwallader C. Washburn William D. Washburn Joseph C. Russell Horatio P. Van Cleve Charlotte O. Lennon John H. Stevens Caleb D. Dorr Rev. Edward D. Neill John Wensignor Robert H. Hasty Stephen Pratt Capt.

John Tapper R. Cummings Elias H. Conner C. Foster A. Foster Charles E. Vanderburgh Dorillius Morrison H. Morrison F. Cornell Gen. Nettleton Isaac Atwater Rev. David Brooks Prof. Jabez Brooks John S. Pillsbury Henry T. Wilson R.

Langdon William M. Bracket Thos. Walker Austin H. Young Henry G. Hicks John P. Organization, First Officers St. Paul North St. Forbes Henry M. Larpenteur William H. Nobles Simeon P. Folsom Jacob W. Bass Benjamin W. Brunson Abram S. Elfelt D. Baker Benjamin F. Hoyt John Fletcher Williams Dr. John H. Murphy William H. Tinker George P. Jacobs Lyman Dayton Henry L. Lott W. Davidson Wm. Fisher Charles H. Oakes C. Borup Capt. Russell Blakely Rensselaer R. Nelson George L. Flandrau John B.

Sanborn John R. Irvine Horace R. Bigelow Cushman K. Davis S. McMillan Willis A. Gorman John D. Ludden Elias F. Drake Norman W. Kittson Hascal R. Brill Ward W. Folsom [Pg xl] Gordon E. Cole James Smith, Jr. Whitcher T. Newson Alvaren Allen Harlan P. Dakota County.

Crosby G. Le Duc Goodhue County. Hubbard William Colville Martin S. Wilson Wabasha County. Tefft James Wells Winona County. Scenery Winona City Daniel S. Norton William Windom Charles H. Pierre Bottineau Andrew G. Dunnell James H. Baker Horace B. McDonald Thomas H. Armstrong Augustus Armstrong Moses K. Armstrong James B. Paul Railroad St.

Stuntz on Lake Superior and St. Croix Canal Waterways Convention, E. Durant’s Valuable Statistics Resolution for St. Croix Ice Boats James W. Mullen’s Reminiscences, St. Croix Rev. Julius S. Scott, Maj. Anderson, and Jeff. Davis Jeff. Military History of the Rebellion, to Gov.

After mature deliberation we concluded to go West. Returning to Bloomfield, I collected the money held for me by Capt. Ruel Weston and was soon in readiness for the journey. But a few days before the time agreed upon for leaving, I received a letter from Simeon Goodrich, which contained the unpleasant information that he could not collect the amount due him and could not go with me. Truly this was a disappointment.

I was obliged to set out alone, no light undertaking at that early day, for as yet there were no long lines of railroad between Maine and the Mississippi river. The day at last arrived for me to start. My companions and acquaintances chaffed me as to the perils of the journey before me. My mother gave me her parting words, “William, always respect yourself in order to be respected. The stage took us directly to the steamboat at Gardiner. The steam was up and the boat was soon under way.

It was the New England, the first boat of the kind I had ever seen. I felt strangely unfamiliar with the ways of the traveling world, but observed what others did, and asked no questions, and so fancied that my ignorance of traveling customs would not be exposed.

It was sunset as we floated out into the wide expanse of the Atlantic. The western horizon was tinged with fiery hues, the shores grew fainter and receded from view and the eye could rest at last only upon the watery expanse. All [Pg 2] things seemed new and strange. Next morning a heavy fog hung over the scene. The vessel was at anchor in Boston harbor and we were soon on shore and threading the crooked streets of the capital of Massachusetts.

I was not lost in the wilderness maze of streets, as I had feared I should be, but on leaving Boston on the evening train I took the wrong car and found myself uncomfortably situated in a second or third class car, crowded and reeking with vile odors, from which the conductor rescued me, taking me to the pleasant and elegant car to which my first class ticket entitled me. On arriving at Providence I followed the crowd to the landing and embarked on the steamer President for New York, in which city we remained a day, stopping at the City Hotel on Broadway.

I was greatly impressed with the beauty of part of the city, and the desolate appearance of the Burnt District, concerning the burning of which we had read in our winter camp. I was not a little puzzled with the arrangement of the hotel tables and the printed bills of fare, but closely watched the deportment of others and came through without any serious or mortifying blunder. Stevens for Albany, and on the evening of the same day went to Schenectady by railroad.

Some of the way cars were hauled by horses up hills and inclined planes. There were then only three short lines of railroad in the United States, and I had traveled on two of them. At Schenectady I took passage on a canal boat to Buffalo. I had read about “De Witt Clinton’s Ditch,” and now greatly enjoyed the slow but safe passage it afforded, and the rich prospect of cities, villages and cultivated fields through which we passed.

At Buffalo we remained but one day. We there exchanged eastern paper for western, the former not being current in localities further west. At Buffalo I caught my first glimpse of Lake Erie. I stood upon a projecting pier and recalled, in imagination, the brave Commodore Perry, gallantly defending his country’s flag in one of the most brilliant engagements of the war, the fame whereof had long been familiar to the whole country and the thrilling incidents of which were the theme of story and song even in the wilderness camps of Maine.

The steamer Oliver Newberry bore me from Buffalo to Detroit. From Detroit to Mt. Clemens, Michigan, I went by stage and stopped at the last named place until October 14th, when, being [Pg 3] satisfied that the climate was unhealthy, fever and ague being very prevalent, I returned to Detroit, and on the fifteenth of the same month took passage on the brig Indiana, as steamers had quit running for the season.

The brig was aground two days and nights on the St. Clair flats. A south wind gave us a splendid sail up the Detroit river into Lake Huron. We landed for a short time at Fort Gratiot, at the outlet of the lake, just as the sun was setting.

The fort was built of stone, and presented an impressive appearance. The gaily uniformed officers, the blue-coated soldiers, moving with the precision of machines, the whole scene—the fort, the waving flags, the movement of the troops seen in the mellow sunset light—was impressive to one who had never looked upon the like before.

A favorable breeze springing up, we sped gaily out into the blue Lake Huron. At Saginaw bay the pleasant part of the voyage ended. The weather became rough. A strong gale blew from the bay outward, and baffled all the captain’s skill in making the proper direction.

Profane beyond degree was Capt. McKenzie, but his free-flowing curses availed him nothing. The brig at one time was so nearly capsized that her deck load had rolled to one side and held her in an inclined position. The captain ordered most of the deck load, which consisted chiefly of Chicago liquors, thrown overboard. Unfortunately, several barrels were saved, two of which stood on deck, with open heads. This liquor was free to all. The vessel, lightened of a great part of her load, no longer careened, but stood steady against the waves and before the wind.

It is a pity that the same could not be said of captain, crew and passengers, who henceforth did the careening. They dipped the liquor up in pails and drank it out of handled dippers. They got ingloriously drunk; they rolled unsteadily across the deck; they quarreled, they fought, they behaved like Bedlamites, and how near shipwreck was the goodly brig from that day’s drunken debauch on Chicago free liquor will never be known. The vessel toiled, the men were incapacitated for work, but notwithstanding the tempest of profanity and the high winds, the wrangling of crew and captain, we at last passed Saginaw bay.

The winds were more favorable. Thence to Mackinaw the sky was clear and bright, the air cold. The night before reaching Mackinaw an unusual disturbance occurred above resulting from the abundance of free liquor.

The cook, being [Pg 4] drunk, had not provided the usual midnight supper for the sailors. The key of the caboose was lost; the caboose was broken open, and the mate in the morning was emulating the captain in the use of profane words.

The negro cook answered in the same style, being as drunk as his superior. This cook was a stout, well built man, with a forbidding countenance and, at his best, when sober, was a saucy, ill-natured and impertinent fellow.

When threat after threat had been hurled back and forth, the negro jumped at the mate and knocked him down. The sailors, as by a common impetus, seized the negro, bound him tightly and lashed him to a capstan.

On searching him they found two loaded pistols. These the mate placed close to each ear of the bound man, and fired them off. They next whipped him on the naked back with a rope.

His trunk was then examined and several parcels of poison were found. Another whipping was administered, and this time the shrieks and groans of the victim were piteous. Before he had not even winced.

The monster had prepared himself to deal death alike to crew and passengers, and we all felt a great sense of relief when Capt. We soon passed the thrifty timber and aided our ascent of the craggy sides of the mountain by clinging to the shrubs that found roothold in the crevices of the rocks.

It may not be amiss to say that we rested, that we rested frequently, for mountain climbing is no light work for those unaccustomed to it. While toiling wearily upward we found ourselves enveloped in mist, or a cloud, from which we soon emerged to find the heavens above us clear and bright, while leaden clouds shut out the landscape below.

At twelve o’clock, noon, we were on the summit. By this time the clouds had been dispersed. The air was clear and cold and beneath us lay, as in a beautiful panorama, the lands and lakes of Maine. There are two peaks, about half a mile apart, between which is a valley and a small lake. From the highest of these peaks the view was magnificent. In the far north we imagined we saw Canada. The vast, northern expanse was all unoccupied save by a few farms at the foot of the mountain, and by a few camps of lumbermen, hunters and trappers.

Looking to the northeast, we saw in the blue distance, glittering with snow drifts, Mount Katahdin. A little north of the divide line to Katahdin lay Moosehead lake, the largest, most beautiful lake in Maine. At this season of the year the snow had disappeared from the valleys and hills, but the summits of the mountains were still [Pg xvi] white.

In all directions the scene was grand and inspiring. We could trace the Kennebec river in its windings to the sea and fancied we could see in the dim distance the blue Atlantic. To the southwest mountains seemed piled on mountains, while here and there in intermediate vales bright lakes reflected the blue of the upper deep.

In this direction there were farms, but they looked like mere dots on the face of the earth. Lake Umbagog lay coiled in the shade of distant mountains in the southwest. We fancied that we could see the ragged crest of the white mountain still further beyond. The scene had also its historical associations. Along the base of this mountain, on the northwestern side, ere his name had been sullied by the foulest treason in our country’s history, Benedict Arnold bravely led the Colonial troops in the campaign against Canada.

With him, as an aid, was Col. Bigelow, whose name is given to the mountain. The gallant little army halted on the banks of Dead river at the base of the mountain, and made their camp. While the army was resting at this camp Lieut. Bigelow ascended the mountain and planted his country’s flag upon the highest peak, doubtless the first white man who made the ascent, and the mountain is his monument to-day. Around the site of the camp was planted the colony of Flagstaff.

While we were gazing on the magnificent scene, musing upon its varied beauties and recalling its historical associations, the sun set, and reluctantly we set out on our return, a descent the more perilous because it was growing dark.

Extreme caution was necessary; nevertheless we made good headway, as we found ourselves sometimes sliding and even rolling down the path that we had ascended with so much difficulty in the forenoon. It was long after nightfall that, tired and hungry, we reached Wyman’s hotel on the banks of Dead river.

Lumbering in Maine. The first thing was to select a place for operations. This was done in the open season. When the winter had fairly set in the lumberman, with his ox teams, generally six oxen to a sled, the sleds laden with camp plunder, would start for the pineries. The slow ox teams would consume many days making the journey. The crew of men employed for the winter generally met the teams in camp.

The snow would [Pg xvii] be cleared away for the camp, and a fire built. The cook would prepare a supper of fried pork, fritters or pancakes, tea, syrup and New England apple sauce, the crew meanwhile cutting boughs, wood, etc. Supper over, the cattle were tied to trees and fed. Water was secured for evening use only. A glowing fire would be kept up, around which the crew would gather to spend the evening in talking over the adventures of the day, discussing plans for the morrow or singing camp songs.

Thus the evening would pass merrily and swiftly. At the hour for retiring parties of two would spread their blankets on a couch of fir or cedar boughs, and lie down to rest. Next morning the cook would rise at four o’clock to prepare breakfast, which over, as soon as it was light enough the crew would commence the work of the day. Every man goes to his assigned duties, the boss in charge having the general oversight.

The life of a lumberman is one of exposure to the elements, yet it is not necessarily unfriendly to the development of character. With a well ordered camp and gentlemanly crew the winter may pass away pleasantly, and the young man engaged in the comparatively hard toil of the camp, may, with books and papers and cheerful converse with the more thoughtful of his elders, improve the long evenings spent around the camp fire.

Many a Maine boy has received here the greater part of his training for the duties of after life. Sunday was usually occupied in reading, singing, and doing some of the lighter work of camp, such as repairing sleds, shoeing oxen and making axe helves or visiting neighboring camps. It was a day of rest only so far as the heavier work of the camp was suspended. Sanctuary privileges there were none. The work would often close in the sunny days of March.

The men would mostly depart for home. A few would remain to drive the logs with the first water from the melting of the snows late in April. Driving logs in the rapid waters of Maine is hazardous work. Scarcely a day passes without imminent risk to life and limb of the hardy and venturesome men engaged in the work of breaking log landings and jams, and running boats.

Men are exposed to wet and cold from dawn till dark. This work requires active and vigorous men, constitutionally fitted and carefully trained [Pg xviii] to the work. They are usually sociable, lively and wide awake, these qualities enabling them to endure, and even to enjoy, the life of hardship which they lead, and to which they become so accustomed that they are unwilling to leave it until worn out by its inevitable hardship.

Folsom Frontispiece James S. Blanding Reuben F. Warner opp Rev. Boutwell Devil’s Chair Frank N. Peterson Rev. Washburn opp John S. Pillsbury opp St. Anthony Falls Birdseye View of St. Paul opp Henry H. Sibley opp Alex. Ramsey opp Henry M. Rice opp Edmund Rice opp Wm. Rainey Marshall opp Wm. Fisher John B. Sanborn opp H. Hall Hon. Le Duc Lucius F. Going West. James Duane Doty 19 James H. Lockwood 20 Indian Troubles 21 John S. Jones 31 S. Anderson 55 Emanuel D.

Farmer 56 Col. John Greely 56 Mrs. Leach 58 Socrates Nelson 58 Mrs. William Holcombe William S. Barron George W. Brownell Col. Robert C. Murphy Edward Worth Mrs. Mary C. Worth Maurice M. Samuels Joseph B. McGlothlin Andrew L. Tuttle John Weymouth B. Reynolds Augustus Gaylord James D. Reymert William J. Stratton Elma M. Blanding Blanding Family Frederick G. Bartlett Michael Field Alden Rev. Peabody V. Smith Clayton Reuben F. Nason Joel F.

Gallespie Luck William H. Carmi P. Garlick John S. Godfrey William A. Talboys Charles H. Staples J. Peake George Wilson Samuel B. Dresser Frederic A. Dresser Oscar A. Clark Oscar F. Knapp Mrs. Elisabeth B.

Hayes Cyrus G. Bradley W. Hale Edgar C. Treadwell St. Croix Falls St. Samuel Deneen William W. John B. Page Dr. Henning Moses S. Gibson Col. Otis Hoyt S. Fuller Miles H. Van Meter Philip B. Jewell John Tobin Horace A. Moffatt James H. Childs William Dwelley James M. Fulton Marcus A. Fulton David C. Fulton N. Holden William H. Semmes Sterling Jones D. Bailey Henry C. Baker Mert Herrick D. Baldwin John Comstock Lucius P. Wetherby John C. Spooner Thomas Porter Herman L.

Humphrey Theodore Cogswell Frank P. Catlin Charles Y. Denniston A. Jefferson Samuel C. Symonds John E. Price E. Bundy Towns and Biographies. Bradley William Dailey Robert and Wm. Johnson Joel Bartlett Francis W.

Bartlett George C. Hough Silas Staples Dr. Henry Murdock Steven N. Samuel Harriman St. Vance Allen R. Wilson E. Pierce Hans B. Taylor John Huitt John M.

Thayer A. Andrews Joseph A. Short Prof. Allen H. Weld Allen P. Weld George W. Nichols W. Powell Oliver S. Powell Nils P. Haugen H. Burnett County. Stratton Barron County. Ashland County.

Haskell G. Vaughn Dr. Edwin Ellis Martin Beaser Hon. Sam S. Fifield Bayfield County. Newton Judge Solon H. Clough Vincent Roy D. Frederic Ayer Rev. William T. Boutwell Discovery of Itasca [Pg xxx] Mrs. Hester C. Grant, Sr. Robinson Hiram Brackett Randall K. Burrows John S. Kanabec County. History, Boundaries, etc. Danforth N. Danforth Alvah J. Cater M. Cater Edwin Allen John H. Allen A. Damon [Pg xxxi] C. Ingalls Mrs. Lavina L. Hallberg Charles A.

Anderson Frank N. Pratt Voloro D. Eddy F. Brown Patten W. Davis James F. Harvey Floyd S. Bates Isaac H. Warner Charles F. Lowe Wells Farr John G. Mold George L. Blood Joel G. Jesse Taylor Joshua L. Taylor Nathan C. Taylor Thomas F. Morton Henry N. Setzer Patrick Fox William F. Newbury Emil Munch A. Wilmarth Lucius K. Stannard James W. Mullen David Caneday George B. Folsom Aaron M. Chase Peter Abear Levi W. Folsom Eddington Knowles Dr. Lucius B.

Smith William Comer E. Whiting and Brothers Frederic Tang, Sr. Folsom George W. Seymour James A. Edwards Stephen J. Gray John P. Tombler Dr. Furber Samuel W.

Furber Theodore Furber James S. Dibble George Harris Harley D. Crosby Reuben H. Parker Hiram Berkey George B. Otis William Clark James R. Meredith [Pg xxxiv] John D. Ward Samuel Judd Frederic W. Lammers James R. Ford Daniel Hopkins, Sr. Lyman Henry A. Jackman Frederic J. City of Stillwater.

Isaac Staples Samuel F. Murdock George M. Seymour Frank A. Susannah Tepass William E. Thorne Edmund J. Butts A. Easton Edwin A. Folsom John B. Castle Abraham L. Gallespie John C.

Gardiner V. Seward Ralph Wheeler Edward S. Van Voorhes Andrew J. Van Voorhes Henry C. Van Voorhes C. Bromley Charles J. Butler Levi E. Thompson George Davis William M. McCluer John N. Ahl Samuel M.

Register J. Johnson Gold T. Curtis Harley D. Curtis Francis R. Delano Henry W. Cannon Dwight M. Stearns County. Organization and History of St. Wilson Charles T. Stearns Henry G. Collins Henry C. Waite Gen. Lowry A. Evans Ambrose Freeman Nathan F. Barnes Nehemiah P. Clark Oscar E. Garrison Charles A.

Gilman Other Citizens Anoka County. Arnold S. Ridge J. Green S. Haskell M. Frost A. Bean A. Fridley William Staples Capt.

James Starkey Sherburne County. DeLille Howard M. Atkins B. Cater J. Bean J. Jamieson A. Heath Dr. George Royal George W. Benton County. Benedict J. Wood William H. Wood Mrs. Wood A. DeLacy Wood P. Wood Rev. Hamlin Morrison County. Churchill John M. Kidder Warren Kobe Ola K. Black Ira W. Bouch Robert Russell Peter A. Green Rodolphus D. Kinney John D. Logan Crow Wing County. White Allen Morrison Charles F. Aitkin County.

Watkins St. Louis County. Stuntz George E. Stone Charles H. Graves Ozro P. Stearns Lake County. Description Two Harbors Cook County. Anthony Incorporated Annexation to Minneapolis, St.

Anthony List of Mayors Water vs. Calvin A. Tuttle Cyrus Aldrich Dr. Alfred E. Ames Dr. Albert A. Ames Jesse Ames Cadwallader C. Washburn William D. Washburn Joseph C. Russell Horatio P. Van Cleve Charlotte O. Lennon John H. Stevens Caleb D. Dorr Rev.

Edward D. Neill John Wensignor Robert H. Hasty Stephen Pratt Capt. John Tapper R. Cummings Elias H. Conner C. Foster A. Foster Charles E. Vanderburgh Dorillius Morrison H. Morrison F. Cornell Gen. Nettleton Isaac Atwater Rev. David Brooks Prof.

Jabez Brooks John S. Pillsbury Henry T. Wilson R. Langdon William M. Bracket Thos. Walker Austin H. Young Henry G. Hicks John P. Organization, First Officers St. Paul North St. Forbes Henry M. Larpenteur William H.

Nobles Simeon P. Folsom Jacob W. Bass Benjamin W. Brunson Abram S. Elfelt D. Baker Benjamin F. Hoyt John Fletcher Williams Dr.

John H. Murphy William H. Tinker George P. Jacobs Lyman Dayton Henry L. Lott W. Davidson Wm. Fisher Charles H. Oakes C. Borup Capt. Russell Blakely Rensselaer R. Nelson George L. Flandrau John B. Sanborn John R. Irvine Horace R. Bigelow Cushman K. Davis S. McMillan Willis A. Gorman John D. Ludden Elias F. Drake Norman W. Kittson Hascal R. Brill Ward W. Folsom [Pg xl] Gordon E. Cole James Smith, Jr.

Whitcher T. Newson Alvaren Allen Harlan P. Dakota County. Crosby G. Le Duc Goodhue County. Hubbard William Colville Martin S. Wilson Wabasha County. Tefft James Wells Winona County.

Scenery Winona City Daniel S. Norton William Windom Charles H. Pierre Bottineau Andrew G. Dunnell James H. Baker Horace B. McDonald Thomas H. Armstrong Augustus Armstrong Moses K. Armstrong James B.

Paul Railroad St. Stuntz on Lake Superior and St. Croix Canal Waterways Convention, E. Durant’s Valuable Statistics Resolution for St.

Croix Ice Boats James W. Mullen’s Reminiscences, St. Croix Rev. Julius S. Scott, Maj. Anderson, and Jeff. Davis Jeff. Military History of the Rebellion, to Gov. After mature deliberation we concluded to go West. Returning to Bloomfield, I collected the money held for me by Capt.

Ruel Weston and was soon in readiness for the journey. But a few days before the time agreed upon for leaving, I received a letter from Simeon Goodrich, which contained the unpleasant information that he could not collect the amount due him and could not go with me. Truly this was a disappointment. I was obliged to set out alone, no light undertaking at that early day, for as yet there were no long lines of railroad between Maine and the Mississippi river.

The day at last arrived for me to start. My companions and acquaintances chaffed me as to the perils of the journey before me. My mother gave me her parting words, “William, always respect yourself in order to be respected. The stage took us directly to the steamboat at Gardiner. The steam was up and the boat was soon under way.

It was the New England, the first boat of the kind I had ever seen. I felt strangely unfamiliar with the ways of the traveling world, but observed what others did, and asked no questions, and so fancied that my ignorance of traveling customs would not be exposed. It was sunset as we floated out into the wide expanse of the Atlantic. The western horizon was tinged with fiery hues, the shores grew fainter and receded from view and the eye could rest at last only upon the watery expanse.

All [Pg 2] things seemed new and strange. Next morning a heavy fog hung over the scene. The vessel was at anchor in Boston harbor and we were soon on shore and threading the crooked streets of the capital of Massachusetts. I was not lost in the wilderness maze of streets, as I had feared I should be, but on leaving Boston on the evening train I took the wrong car and found myself uncomfortably situated in a second or third class car, crowded and reeking with vile odors, from which the conductor rescued me, taking me to the pleasant and elegant car to which my first class ticket entitled me.

On arriving at Providence I followed the crowd to the landing and embarked on the steamer President for New York, in which city we remained a day, stopping at the City Hotel on Broadway. I was greatly impressed with the beauty of part of the city, and the desolate appearance of the Burnt District, concerning the burning of which we had read in our winter camp. I was not a little puzzled with the arrangement of the hotel tables and the printed bills of fare, but closely watched the deportment of others and came through without any serious or mortifying blunder.

Stevens for Albany, and on the evening of the same day went to Schenectady by railroad. Some of the way cars were hauled by horses up hills and inclined planes.

There were then only three short lines of railroad in the United States, and I had traveled on two of them. At Schenectady I took passage on a canal boat to Buffalo. I had read about “De Witt Clinton’s Ditch,” and now greatly enjoyed the slow but safe passage it afforded, and the rich prospect of cities, villages and cultivated fields through which we passed.

At Buffalo we remained but one day. We there exchanged eastern paper for western, the former not being current in localities further west. At Buffalo I caught my first glimpse of Lake Erie. I stood upon a projecting pier and recalled, in imagination, the brave Commodore Perry, gallantly defending his country’s flag in one of the most brilliant engagements of the war, the fame whereof had long been familiar to the whole country and the thrilling incidents of which were the theme of story and song even in the wilderness camps of Maine.

The steamer Oliver Newberry bore me from Buffalo to Detroit. From Detroit to Mt. Clemens, Michigan, I went by stage and stopped at the last named place until October 14th, when, being [Pg 3] satisfied that the climate was unhealthy, fever and ague being very prevalent, I returned to Detroit, and on the fifteenth of the same month took passage on the brig Indiana, as steamers had quit running for the season.

The brig was aground two days and nights on the St. Clair flats. A south wind gave us a splendid sail up the Detroit river into Lake Huron. We landed for a short time at Fort Gratiot, at the outlet of the lake, just as the sun was setting. The fort was built of stone, and presented an impressive appearance.

The gaily uniformed officers, the blue-coated soldiers, moving with the precision of machines, the whole scene—the fort, the waving flags, the movement of the troops seen in the mellow sunset light—was impressive to one who had never looked upon the like before. A favorable breeze springing up, we sped gaily out into the blue Lake Huron. At Saginaw bay the pleasant part of the voyage ended. The weather became rough. A strong gale blew from the bay outward, and baffled all the captain’s skill in making the proper direction.

Profane beyond degree was Capt. McKenzie, but his free-flowing curses availed him nothing. The brig at one time was so nearly capsized that her deck load had rolled to one side and held her in an inclined position. The captain ordered most of the deck load, which consisted chiefly of Chicago liquors, thrown overboard.

Unfortunately, several barrels were saved, two of which stood on deck, with open heads. This liquor was free to all. The vessel, lightened of a great part of her load, no longer careened, but stood steady against the waves and before the wind. It is a pity that the same could not be said of captain, crew and passengers, who henceforth did the careening. They dipped the liquor up in pails and drank it out of handled dippers. They got ingloriously drunk; they rolled unsteadily across the deck; they quarreled, they fought, they behaved like Bedlamites, and how near shipwreck was the goodly brig from that day’s drunken debauch on Chicago free liquor will never be known.

The vessel toiled, the men were incapacitated for work, but notwithstanding the tempest of profanity and the high winds, the wrangling of crew and captain, we at last passed Saginaw bay. The winds were more favorable. Thence to Mackinaw the sky was clear and bright, the air cold. The night before reaching Mackinaw an unusual disturbance occurred above resulting from the abundance of free liquor. The cook, being [Pg 4] drunk, had not provided the usual midnight supper for the sailors. The key of the caboose was lost; the caboose was broken open, and the mate in the morning was emulating the captain in the use of profane words.

The negro cook answered in the same style, being as drunk as his superior. This cook was a stout, well built man, with a forbidding countenance and, at his best, when sober, was a saucy, ill-natured and impertinent fellow.

When threat after threat had been hurled back and forth, the negro jumped at the mate and knocked him down. The sailors, as by a common impetus, seized the negro, bound him tightly and lashed him to a capstan. On searching him they found two loaded pistols. These the mate placed close to each ear of the bound man, and fired them off. They next whipped him on the naked back with a rope. His trunk was then examined and several parcels of poison were found. Another whipping was administered, and this time the shrieks and groans of the victim were piteous.

Before he had not even winced. The monster had prepared himself to deal death alike to crew and passengers, and we all felt a great sense of relief when Capt. McKenzie delivered him to the authorities at Mackinaw. Antique Mackinaw was a French and half-breed town. The houses were built of logs and had steep roofs. Trading posts and whisky shops were well barred.

The government fort, neatly built and trim, towered up above the lake on a rocky cliff and overlooked the town, the whole forming a picturesque scene. We remained but a few hours at Mackinaw. There were ten cabin passengers, and these, with two exceptions, had imbibed freely of the Chicago free liquor.

They were also continually gambling. McKenzie had fought a fist fight with a deadhead passenger, Capt. Fox, bruising him badly. What with his violence and profanity, the brutality of the mate and the drunken reveling of crew and passengers, the two sober passengers had but a sorry time, but the safe old brig, badly officered, badly managed, held steadily on its course, and October 30th, fifteen days from Detroit, safely landed us in Chicago.

After being so long on the deck of a tossing vessel, I experienced a strange sensation when first on shore. I had become accustomed to the motion of the vessel, and had managed to hold myself steady. On shore the pitching and tossing movement seemed to continue, only it seemed transferred to my head, [Pg 5] which grew dizzy, and so produced the illusion that I was still trying to balance myself on the unsteady deck of the ship.

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